Bouncing Back from the Boston Tragedy

KIMT News 3- For an avid runner pounding the pavement is a passion.

“When you do things like marathons, it’s really almost a celebration, a party, because it’s the culmination of all training you’ve done for months,” says Dr. Eric Shoars.

But Shoars worries that the tragedy in Boston is casting a dark shadow over the activity he enjoys so much.

“Now people are going to be showing up at marathons wondering, you know, when I cross the finish line, is something bad going to happen? There’s going to be that twinge of maybe fear or apprehension or anxiety,” Shoars adds.

Physical Therapist Kurt Walderbach says for those who experienced the trauma yesterday, there will be more than just physical rehabilitation ahead.

“There’s a mental rehab component as well so physically you get yourself ready but now you’ve got to mentally get that into a part of your mind where you can deal with it, that piece of it will be, they’ll have to over come that,” explains Walderbach.

And overcoming that experience won’t be an easy road.

“Having that now engrained in their memory, you know every time they go for a run their going to think about what when down,” adds Walderbach.

But Dr. Shoars isn’t letting this act of violence stop him from lacing up his running shoes once again.

“If you allow the terrorists, whether it’s international or home-grown, to stop what you would normally do, then they win. And I simply refuse to let them win.”

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