The Many Benefits of Community Gardens

COMMUNITY GARDEN

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CLEAR LAKE, Iowa – Planting a garden might be the last thing on your mind with these cold temperatures we’ve been seeing but once it warms up, you might want to consider it.

It’s been shown that community gardens can provide nutritional and social benefits, but now there is data to back that up.

The University of Utah is finding that people who participate in community gardens are less likely to be overweight than those who don’t.

“We saw the land that we had as an opportunity again for us to give back and use to help and serve our community and we really did want to give people the opportunity to grow their fresh produce that they could grow themselves,” says Curtis McGinnis who coordinates the Community Garden at the Church of Christ, in Clear Lake.

He’s even seen some other benefits that can come from participating in a community garden.

Come May, folks in Mason City will be able to participate in a new community garden.

The garden is a part of the city’s Blue Zones Project.

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