Floyd County Flood Worries

KIMT News 3

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FLOYD COUNTY, IA –  Emergency management crews spent Wednesday night in Nora Springs,  checking on the levy on the Shell Rock River. It’s the same levy that broke through during the 2008 floods.

The levy did not break through during this storm,  but crews did issue alerts to folks living downstream in Rockford.

“I woke up at 2am. They were cleaning out the fire station, I’ve been up ever since watching it come up,” said Dean Walker, who has lived on the river for 14 years.

He remembers the major flooding of 2008.  Both this time and then, he’s been lucky.

“To the curb, but it didn’t get on my land, my basement is dry, I’m in good shape,” said Walker.

Walker said this house was bought out by FEMA after the 2008 floods but was then re-purchased by a Rockford resident.

Now, the flooding in Rockford can be traced back to Nora Springs.

“The water was going over the levy at that time. That’s what it’s actually designed to do. There’s rip-rap that’s in the levy that helps stop it that was repaired from the 2008 floods when it broke through,” said Floyd County Emergency Manager Michael Morlan.

The threat of the levy breaking through again is what brought crews to this spot late last night. At that point, Morlan said they issued code red alerts to folks living downstream in Rockford. The river was at about 18 feet during the storm last night but that won’t last for long.

“They’re reaching their peak or will be reaching their peak at some point very shortly and at that point they will start residing and the river level will go down,” said Morlan.

Flood threat or not, it’s nothing that will concern Dean Walker too much.

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