Watching Out for Motorcycles

Steve Minert of Harley Davidson in Mason City Mason City, IA

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MASON CITY, IA – You can hear them revving by.

Steve Minert, an avid motorcyclist for more than 30 years, says when the weather gets nice like this, it’s a great time to remind others about looking out for those riding around just like him.

“It’s kind of a characteristic of summer. Getting going you got a lot of anxious people who have been bottled up inside for a long time. Their just getting out on the road for the first time we all kind of have to fit together on the same amount of space,” said Steve.

Steve says it’s all about working together.

Those riding motorcycles need to remember what they were schooled on.

“To keep motorcycles well maintained. To be aware make sure you’re in a good state of mind before you climb onto that motorcycle and be aware of your surroundings at all times,” said Steve.

And Lieutenant Dan Schaffer with the Iowa State Patrol is right on board

“It’s a situation where everybody needs to do their part for safety.  Motorcycles need to drive defensively and cars need to pay attention,” said Schaffer.

Now while both cars and motorcycles are equipped with mirrors to look out for each other, it’s still important to look above the mirrors and on the roads for each other.

“Drivers make mistakes no matter what vehicle they drive and do cars miss motorcycles, absolutely. Smaller vehicle harder to see that’s why we say don’t drive while your distracted,” said Schaffer.

For Steve, he just wants a peaceful and safe summer for everyone.

“Just give motorcycles a break. Look twice in your rearview mirror before changing lanes; remember we are a little more vulnerable than people in automobiles,” said Steve.

Lieutenant Schaffer says that 50 percent of fatal accidents involving a motorcycle are singular vehicle accidents.

Which means just the motorcycle was at fault.

The other 50 percent of those types of accidents usually involves another car.

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