Beed’s Lake Fights Contamination

SWIMMING ADVISORY PKG

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HAMPTON, IA – An abnormal level of E. Coli is found in one north Iowa lake beach, and residents say it’s an issue that needs to be taken care of.

Beed’s Lake in Hampton is forcing residents to take extra precaution after E. Coli levels exceeded the normal amount.

“I get calls every week from people that are concerned with how the lake tested,” said Roger Marchant of Hampton.

For Concessionaire, Roger Marchant, this lake is a second home.
He’s a Hampton native who remembers days of enjoying the entire lake without worries and this isn’t the first time he’s seen Beed’s Lake have a swimming advisory posted.

“Some people care, some people don’t care. They will go swimming no matter what and other people, it scares them and they go away,” said Marchant.

Since he makes his living here, he hopes most people don’t avoid the lake.

“There’s probably been E. Coli in it for years and nobody ever tested it and it never hurt anybody before. It would be nice if they would clean it up a bit. If the state would help clean it up,” said Doug Casey of Hampton.

It’s business as usual at Beed’s Lake as campers line the campgrounds and those fishing hit the water.

It’s safe to say this warning isn’t keeping people from enjoying the lake.

The swimming advisory acts as a warning but doesn’t mean beach goers can’t swim near the shore.

It simply means extra precautions such as showering after swimming and not swallowing water must be taken into consideration, but those who live here say it’s a sign of a larger issue with the lake that needs to be addressed.

They say the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is not properly maintaining the lake’s depth, putting it more at risk for contamination like we’re seeing today.

“I don’t know if there was a problem back then, if they really knew that there was and we survived. It would be nice to see something done. It’s a nice lake and it would be nice to see people swimming and get out there,” said Jessica Johnson of Hampton.

“I guess my length of time in this area and the fact that my grand kids are here, I would seriously like to see this lake back to normal as far as the depth on the west end. If there’s any problems on the east side here, they should take care of that too,” said Marchant.

Until then, beach goers are fighting the contamination, one fishing rod at a time.

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