Crops Suffering from Spring Weather

Erwin Johnson Charles City, IA

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KIMT NEWS 3 – “I’m a veteran; a veteran should be able to say hey I’ve been through this before I can handle this you know, but I’m human too, and you want to excel you want to do the best you can and I’m not able to do that this year,” said Erwin Johnson.

Looking at the bright side of things is something Erwin Johnson has come to learn to do as a farmer.

But this year, he can’t help but be a little anxious.

“We’re dealing with a late crop, late pollination. Here it is almost the last week of July and our corn, some of our earliest corn is just starting to tassel,” said Johnson.

As of right now the corn needs 60 days to pollinate to mature.

Johnson says the corn is maturing at a slow pace, because of the weather this year.

So he and many other farmers are hoping the fall will be like the spring and arrive late.

He hopes the first frost holds off until October.

“It’s another risk that we’ve thrown out there that normally we wouldn’t have in the sense that because we’re delayed in planting, we’ll be delayed in harvest, and so we need a delayed frost this fall,” said Johnson.

And even sweet corn sellers, with stands popping up all over our area, agree this year has not been ideal.

“Very tough getting stuff planted of course. We didn’t plant as much as we did in the past years because of the wet weather,” said Tom Waterman, a salesman for Harrington sweet corn.

And the ears they’re bringing in aren’t quite up to people’s expectations.

So they’re putting in a few extra ears into people’s bags, to make up for it.

“I would say as far as from last year to this year yeah we have more corn, but the acres are down,” said Waterman.

And for Johnson, and many others, the whole situation is adding a little stress to the annual waiting game.

“There are some farmers out there that are really going to stress through a lot of stress because they rented ground, they paid a pretty good price for it, and economy they’re going to suffer this year. It’s going to really hurt their back pocket,” said Johnson.

But on a brighter note, Waterman says sweet corn sales have been going smoothly thus far.

He says many understand that this year is a hard year for many in the farming business.

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