Mexican officials say 58 are missing after landslide smashes into tiny mountain village

ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) — Hurricane Manuel has killed scores of people and it’s now moving up Mexico’s Pacific coast.

Mexico’s government raised the death toll from Manuel to 80 Wednesday, but another 58 people are missing after a massive landslide smashed through a tiny village in the country’s southern mountains. The rain continues to inundate the area as rescue workers try to evacuate anyone left in La Pintada. Emergency teams reached the isolated hamlet by helicopter and evacuated 334 people, some of them injured.

Manuel devastated Mexico’s Pacific coast over the weekend then regained strength Wednesday to become a hurricane. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Manuel remains a Category 1 hurricane hugging Mexico’s coast early Thursday and is expected to produce 75 mph winds and up to 10 inches of rain over the state of Sinaloa. Officials there say some areas are already flooding and dozens have been evacuated from fishing villages.

It is a third blow to a country still reeling from the one-two punch of Manuel’s first landfall and Hurricane Ingrid on Mexico’s eastern coast.

%@AP Links

307-a-05-(Eric Blake, hurricane specialist, National Hurricane Center, in AP interview)-”very heavy rain”-Eric Blake, with the National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Manuel is taking aim at Mexico, with wind and rain. ((watch for dating)) (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *307 (09/18/13)££ 00:05 “very heavy rain”

308-a-08-(Eric Blake, hurricane specialist, National Hurricane Center, in AP interview)-”be very destructive”-Eric Blake, with the National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Manuel will drop a lot of heavy rain on the affected areas. ((watch for dating)) (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *308 (09/18/13)££ 00:08 “be very destructive”

309-a-08-(Eric Blake, hurricane specialist, National Hurricane Center, in AP interview)-”the immediate coast”-Eric Blake, with the National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Manuel’s wind and rain could be very destructive. ((watch for dating)) (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *309 (09/18/13)££ 00:08 “the immediate coast”

310-a-08-(Eric Blake, hurricane specialist, National Hurricane Center, in AP interview)-”even well inland”-Eric Blake, with the National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Manuel is expected to cause storm surge along the coast and other problems inland. ((watch for dating)) (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *310 (09/18/13)££ 00:08 “even well inland”

304-a-10-(David Jefferson Gled, tourist from Bristol, England, in AP interview)-”machines weren’t working”-English tourist David Jefferson Gled says he’s trapped in the Mexican resort of Acapulco by flooding. (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *304 (09/18/13)££ 00:10 “machines weren’t working”

306-r-14-(Sound of people wading through standing water, in Acapulco)–Sound of people wading through standing water in Acapulco. (18 Sep 2013)

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305-r-09-(Sound of crowd cheering and screaming, as a curtain or table cloth is tossed over a captured crocodile)–Sound of crowd cheering and screaming as a curtain or table cloth is tossed over a captured crocodile. (18 Sep 2013)

<<CUT *305 (09/18/13)££ 00:09

APPHOTO MXAG105: A man uses a makeshift zip line to cross a river after a bridge collapsed under the force of the rains caused by Tropical Storm Manuel near the town of Petaquillas, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. The death toll from devastating twin storms climbed to 80 on Wednesday as isolated areas reported to the outside world. Mexican officials said that a massive landslide in the mountains north of Acapulco could drive the number of confirmed dead even higher. (AP Photo/Alejandrino Gonzalez) (18 Sep 2013)

<<APPHOTO MXAG105 (09/18/13)££

APPHOTO MXEV108: People wade through waist-high water in a store’s parking, looking for valuables, south of Acapulco, in Punta Diamante, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Mexico was hit by the one-two punch of twin storms over the weekend, and the storm that soaked Acapulco on Sunday – Manuel -re-formed into a tropical storm Wednesday, threatening to bring more flooding to the country’s northern coast. With roads blocked by landslides, rockslides, floods and collapsed bridges, Acapulco was cut off from road transport. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo) (18 Sep 2013)

<<APPHOTO MXEV108 (09/18/13)££

APPHOTO MXEV104: People stand on the edge of a collapsed bridge as they wait to ferry their goods via a boat across the Papagayos River, south of Acapulco, near Lomas de Chapultepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Mexico was hit by the one-two punch of twin storms over the weekend, and the storm that soaked Acapulco on Sunday – Manuel -re-formed into a tropical storm Wednesday, threatening to bring more flooding to the country’s northern coast. With roads blocked by landslides, rockslides, floods and collapsed bridges, Acapulco was cut off from road transport. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo) (18 Sep 2013)

<<APPHOTO MXEV104 (09/18/13)££

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